Richard Madeley on worrying health symptoms: 'I could hardly string a sentence together!'


Speaking to Good Morning Britain hosts and co-workers Susanna Reid and Ben Shephard, Richard revealed that he could “hardly string a sentence together”, the morning after he took part in a Bushtucker trial. Being rushed to hospital on Tuesday, November 25, Richard said that he was “talking nonsense” due to being severely dehydrated and not having slept in 20 hours. Worrying his fellow campmates, the star also said that he had lost about three to four pounds in weight in a mere eight days on the brutal reality show.

“Not much was functioning at all. I think I got dehydrated,” Richard continued to explain.

“Anyone who has been dehydrated knows it’s not pleasant at all.

“I had been up for 20 hours the day before and I didn’t get to bed until about 4:30 in the morning. I’m bad at remembering to drink anyway, but I remember getting into bed and thinking I’m really thirsty, but I thought I would drink when I woke up.

“The next thing I remember I was talking absolute nonsense. I was incoherent, I didn’t know where I was. I could hardly string a sentence together!”

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The Mayo Clinic explains that dehydration occurs when individuals lose more fluid than they take in.

As your body doesn’t have enough water and other fluids to carry out its normal functions it becomes dehydrated, which can be extremely dangerous – as Richard found out.

Typical symptoms of dehydration in an adult include the following:

  • Extreme thirst
  • Less frequent urination
  • Dark-colored urine
  • Fatigue
  • Dizziness
  • Confusion.

However, the medical site goes on to explain that many adults do feel thirsty until they are already dehydrated, making thirst an unreliable indicator of dehydration.

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Therefore, it is important to increase water intake during hot weather or when feeling ill, in order to avoid a state of dehydration.

Dehydration can also be extremely dangerous for infants and young children. Symptoms also slightly differ in children. These include:

  • Dry mouth and tongue
  • No tears when crying
  • No wet diapers for three hours
  • Sunken eyes, cheeks
  • Sunken soft spot on top of skull
  • Listlessness or irritability.

In order to reduce the risk of dehydration you need to replace the fluids within your body. The NHS explains that individuals may find it hard to drink because you may feel sick, but starting with small sips and gradually drinking more will help curb this effect.

Individuals should drink enough in order to make their urine turn a pale colour, or when they are at a higher risk of becoming dehydrated.

Dehydration can happen more easily if you have:

  • Diabetes
  • Vomiting or diarrhoea
  • Been in the sun too long (heatstroke)
  • Drunk too much alcohol
  • Sweated too much after exercising
  • A high temperature of 38C or more
  • Been taking medicines that make you pee more (diuretics).

If you or someone you know is really struggling with dehydration after suffering from diarrhoea and sickness, then a pharmacist can recommend oral rehydration sachets to aid rehydration.

However, if you notice any of the following symptoms, it is crucial to seek medical attention immediately and call 999:

  • You’re feeling unusually tired
  • You’re confused and disorientated
  • Any dizziness when you stand up does not go away
  • You have not peed all day
  • Your pulse is weak or rapid
  • You have fits (seizures).

In addition to being dehydrated, Richard was also battling extreme fatigue, which can have severe effects on your health.

The NHS explains that one in three people suffer from poor sleep, and the effects of a restless night’s sleep is more than just bad moves and a lack of focus.

Regular poor sleep puts you at risk of serious medical conditions, including obesity, coronary heart disease and diabetes – and it shortens your life expectancy.

Although campmates are completely unaware of the time when filming I’m A Celebrity… Get Me Out of Here!, they can still feel the effects of fatigue and often do not get the required eight hours of good-quality sleep a night.

The NHS recommends trying these tips in order to sleep better:

  • Sleeping at regular times
  • Wind down before bed
  • Making your bed-room ‘sleep friendly’
  • Keeping a sleep diary.



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