Mourners salute girl, 10, who lost cancer battle

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Mourners salute girl, 10, who lost cancer battle

Mourners salute girl, 10, who lost cancer battle after Covid lockdown stopped her flying to the US for experimental treatmentEva Willi

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Mourners salute girl, 10, who lost cancer battle after Covid lockdown stopped her flying to the US for experimental treatment

  • Eva Williams, from Wrexham, died in January after a year-long cancer battle 
  • She had planned to fly to New York for treatment but was unable to amid Covid 
  • Hundreds of mourners gathered in Wrexham to salute Eva’s funeral carriage 

Mourners today gathered to pay tribute to a young girl who lost her battle with cancer after coronavirus lockdown stopped her from flying to the US for treatment. 

Eva Williams, 10, passed away on January 8, around 12 months after she was diagnosed with a rare high-grade diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma brain tumour. 

The girl, from Wrexham in north Wales, had complained of dizziness and blurred vision in December 2019 before being referred to Alder Hey Children’s Hospital in Liverpool. 

Here, a CT scan revealed a mass on her brain that was later confirmed to be cancer.

Her family raised more than £300,000 so Eva could undergo experimental treatment in New York, but she became unable to fly when travel restrictions were introduced amid the pandemic in April. 

Eva’s father Paul Slapa, 35, last month confirmed his daughter had died.

Eva Williams (pictured), 10, passed away on January 8, around 12 months after she was diagnosed with a rare high-grade diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma brain tumour

Eva Williams (pictured), 10, passed away on January 8, around 12 months after she was diagnosed with a rare high-grade diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma brain tumour

Hundreds of wellwishers today gathered to release more than 400 balloons as Eva's funeral carriage passed through Wrexham

Hundreds of wellwishers today gathered to release more than 400 balloons as Eva’s funeral carriage passed through Wrexham

Hundreds of wellwishers today gathered to release more than 400 balloons as Eva’s funeral carriage passed through Wrexham.

Lockdown restrictions meant only immediate family could attend the service, but the ceremony at Pentrebychan Crematorium was live streamed over the internet.  

Speaking after his daughter’s death, Mr Slapa said: ‘Eva is an inspiration to many, certainly to me, and I cannot begin to imagine how we will go forward from here.

‘How do we wake up each day and go on? How do we face the world without our baby girl with us? Why did this happen to the most caring and loving of little girls? 

‘Every single part of us is in pain and I can’t see how that can change. We love you Eva – more than you’ll have ever known – and we will keep you with us every day for the rest of our lives.’  

The girl, from Wrexham in north Wales, had complained of dizziness and blurred vision in December 2019 before being referred to Alder Hey Children's Hospital in Liverpool. Pictured: Eva with mother Carran Williams and father Paul Slapa

The girl, from Wrexham in north Wales, had complained of dizziness and blurred vision in December 2019 before being referred to Alder Hey Children’s Hospital in Liverpool. Pictured: Eva with mother Carran Williams and father Paul Slapa

Eva's father Paul Slapa, 35, last month confirmed his daughter had died. Pictured: Mr Slapa and Eva

Eva’s father Paul Slapa, 35, last month confirmed his daughter had died. Pictured: Mr Slapa and Eva

Eva’s cancer battle was previously brought to public attention by Wrexham MP Sarah Atherton during Prime Minister’s Questions in July. 

Boris Johnson had said the Government would endeavour to ‘look at everything we can do to support her travel arrangements.’

However, her mother Carran Williams confirmed during the summer that Eva’s cancer had progressed too far for her to be accepted onto the trial. 

Speaking previously, Mr Slapa said: ‘Any of the trials we chose are all experimental treatment, so we will never know whether or not they would have been successful or not.

‘But the fact is the chance and opportunity to try was taken away by Covid.

‘That’s the thing that really makes you feel like you have been wronged.’

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