How to keep hydrangeas thriving in the heat – prevent 'leaf scorch and poor flowering'

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How to keep hydrangeas thriving in the heat – prevent 'leaf scorch and poor flowering'

Hydrangeas are gorgeous plants which can flower for several months. They come in bright shades including white, blue, green, purple and pink. Unfor

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Hydrangeas are gorgeous plants which can flower for several months. They come in bright shades including white, blue, green, purple and pink. Unfortunately the heat areas of the UK are experiencing can cause many plants, including hydrangeas to suffer. 

The heat can cause hydrangeas to become hard and lose their colour, especially at the edges.

To prevent this from happening, gardeners can add organic matter to the soil.

According to the Royal Horticultural Society (RHS), hydrangeas like moist soils that are not prone to waterlogging.

Soil can be hard to keep moist during the summer months, especially when temperatures reach above 25C.

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Watering when it is hottest can scorch the plants.

Due to hydrangeas thriving in moist soil, they may even need to be watered twice a day.

Gardeners should check the soil throughout the day to make sure they aren’t drying out too much.

Tom Hilton, director of outdoor and indoor gardening specialists, National Greenhouse, recently told Express.co.uk: “If you’ve found yourself in the enemy camp when it comes to your hydrangeas, and you’ve left them abandoned in the heatwave, there’s still hope to mend that relationship. 

“If the leaves have been left to bake and burn, unfortunately, there’s no recovery for them, but the plant itself can still survive. 

“Start by giving the plant’s soil a thorough soak – you may want to use a soaker hose for this.

“To check how deep the water needs to travel down, use a stick or pole to poke down into the soil. 

“After this soak, it’s not a case of a job well done. 

“This will begin to bring hydrangeas back to life, but if they are pretty damaged, it may take a while for you to see the plant and flowers make a full recovery.”

Gardeners in a hosepipe ban area can still use watering cans to water their gardens.



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