Elderly drivers urged to renew driving licence or risk massive fines, DVLA warn

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Elderly drivers urged to renew driving licence or risk massive fines, DVLA warn

When a motorist reaches the age of 70, they are required to renew their driving licence every three years. Renewal is free of charge and any elderl

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When a motorist reaches the age of 70, they are required to renew their driving licence every three years. Renewal is free of charge and any elderly drivers will be sent a letter reminding them to renew before they turn 70.

Drivers should apply for any categories covered on their old licence, if they still want to be able to drive them after they renew their licence.

If they don’t apply for any categories previously covered, they will only be able to drive a car in future.

Reminding drivers on Twitter, the DVLA wrote: “Renewing your licence at 70 is easy to do online, plus it’s quick and secure.”

The DVLA will send older people a D46P application form 90 days before their 70th birthday.

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Renewing licences has been made easier in recent weeks as the DVLA announced major changes designed to speed up the process.

On July 20, the DVLA announced changes which enable healthcare professionals other than doctors to complete DVLA medical questionnaires. 

This would take place following any notification of a medical condition that may affect an individual’s driving.

Specialist nurses and opticians are among the healthcare professionals now able to complete DVLA medical questionnaires.

This is part of an approach by the DVLA to improve and speed up the medical licencing process.

It is hoped that it will also reduce the burden on doctors when filling out medical questionnaires.

An amendment to the Road Traffic Act 1988 means a wider pool of registered healthcare professionals, other than doctors, can now be authorised to provide information where a driver has declared a medical condition.

Roads Minister Baroness Vere praised the changes, saying it would benefit both drivers and healthcare workers.

She said: “Obtaining or renewing a driving licence should always be a quick, simple and efficient process.”



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