Boaters thrown into water, rescued from ‘Circle of Death’ in Massachusetts

HomeNews

Boaters thrown into water, rescued from ‘Circle of Death’ in Massachusetts

Two men were thrown from their out-of-control boat in Massachusetts waters — and narrowly escaped a terrifying phenomenon known as t

First foreign-flagged ship arrives in Ukraine since start of war
5 teens facing charges after friend was allegedly fatally shoved off boat after kiss
Holiday warning as dramatic videos show pods of raging orcas attacking and trying to capsize boats in Brit hotspots


Two men were thrown from their out-of-control boat in Massachusetts waters — and narrowly escaped a terrifying phenomenon known as the “circle of death,” officials said.

The recreational boaters lost control of their 24-foot vessel off the coast of Marshfield shortly before 10 a.m. July 5 and were thrown into the water.

The boat was caught in a tight “high speed” circling pattern known in the boating world as the “circle of death” — which safety experts call the phenomenon where the circling boat strikes ejected boaters in the water, inflicting massive, and often fatal, propeller injuries.

Though neither were wearing lifejackets nor were tethered to the boat’s kill switch, the men escaped the boat’s treacherous path and were not injured.

Luckily for the stranded men, Captain Dana Blackman of the fishing vessel Finest Kind was sailing nearby and noticed one of them waving a white T-shirt from the churning water.

Circle of death
Two boaters in Massachusetts were thrown from their boat and narrowly escaped the dreaded “circle of death.”
Marshfield police department.
Circle of Death
The men, who were not wearing lifejackets, were rescued by a nearby boat.
Marshfield police department.
circle of death
The “circle of death” is a phenomenon in which an out-of-control boat traveling in circles strikes ejected boaters in the water.
Marshfield police department.

It took 90 minutes for a sea tow to control the spinning boat. The vessel was traveling on a westerly track towards Green Harbor and Brant Rock, but because Marshfield police feared the direction could rapidly change, officers temporarily closed beaches and set up a one-mile security zone.

“This is a stark reminder of how fast incidents can occur on the water without notice,” Marshfield Chief Phillip A. Tavares wrote in a statement. “We urge the use of life jackets and tethering of the vessel safety kill switch. These incidents can happen to the most experienced mariners.”

COMMENTS

WORDPRESS: 0
DISQUS: 0